• Design,  Floors,  Research & Resources

    Floor covering options for Limecrete

    Victorian terraced houses often have suspended wooden floors, sometimes with a solid floor in the rear scullery that later tends to have changed use to become the kitchen area. Replacing the floor in an older property should be done with care to avoid unintentional damage to the fabric of the property. Limecrete is a breathable, solid floor alternative to a poured concrete floor or a suspended wooden floor. But what exactly is it and what are your floor covering options to ensure the all-important vapour permeability is retained? How is a limecrete solid floor created? Limecrete is generally laid without a damp proof membrane, with foamed glass aggregate underneath which…

  • Floors,  Measurements

    Measuring floor ‘undulations’!

    Before taking up the floorboards to clear out the subfloor,  inspect the joists and so on, it made sense to measure and document the interesting bowed floor. There is a noticeable hump or hillock in the middle of the room, which is distinctly impractical. Character in a old property is one thing… but this is not really functional for everyday living! We used a laser level to ‘skim’ the beam across the floorboards to locate the highest point in the room. This turned out to be the spot right in front of the fireplace hearth. This made some sense visually, since the hearth was angled sharply down from its front…

  • Damp,  Floors

    Underfloor discoveries… 14/11/2016

    Yesterday we made some plans for what timbers to use around the window, on the external corners of the bay and as batons for shelf support in the alcove. We also decided to lift some floorboards to clear out the detritus & get a better sense of what’s going on under there! All boards were carefully numbered to ensure we can put them back in the same order and direction. The single airbrick in the bay was blocked internally which means there has been no ventilation to the subfloor for a while. Additionally, no gap exists in the wall between the lounge/dining room which presumably prevents cross-ventilation from one side…